How To Use Who And Whom?

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How do you use whom in a sentence examples?

The object is the person, place, or thing that something is being done to. Examples of “whom” in a sentence: He saw the faces of those whom he loved at his birthday celebration. She saw a lady whom she presumed worked at the store, and she asked her a question.

Who and whom easy explanation?

According to the rules of grammar, the word who should be used when it is the subject of a sentence, and whom should be used when it is the object or if it comes after a preposition.

Who I have or whom I have?

The commonly repeated advice for remembering whether to use who or whom is this: If you can replace the word with he or she or another subject pronoun, use who. If you can replace it with him or her (or another object pronoun), use whom. One way to remember this trick is that both him and whom end with the letter m.

Can whom be used for plural?

Answer and Explanation:

The word “whom” is a pronoun that can replace a singular or plural noun. “Whom” is only used as the object of a sentence or as a

Who I met or whom I met?

Yes, that’s correct. Who is used as the subject of a sentence or clause. Whom is used as the object of a preposition and as a direct object. In your sentence, the pronoun would refer to the direct object, so to be correct, you should say, “The boy whom I met at the party.”

Who vs whom examples sentences?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Who vs whom in a statement?

“Who” is generally used for the subject, while “whom” is generally the object in the sentence. If the question is considered a statement, we have to check whether the subject can be replaced by pronouns like “he,” “she,” etc., or “him,” “her,” etc.

Who vs whom exercises?

The basic convention is that the pronoun who is used as the subject of a verb, and whom is used as the object of a verb or a preposition. The pronouns he and him work the same way. If you can substitute he, then the choice is who. If you can use him, the choice is whom.

Is many of whom correct?

“Of whom” is a prepositional phrase modifying “many.” “Whom” is what you use instead of “who” when the word is the object of a verb or preposition. “Many of whom” is a phrase familiar to many as an idiomatic construction.

Who do I love or whom I love?

1 Answer. The original is probably eliding a word. You are she whom I love. ‘are’ is a linking verb here; ‘whom’ is introducing an appositive phrase and is the object of ‘love’.

Who is she or who she is?

“Who is she?” is a question and a complete sentence. “Who she is” is not a complete sentence. It needs a subject and verb to complete it. For instance, you might write, “I do not know who she is.” Or you might make a question of it by writing, “Can you tell me who she is?”

Is Whomst a word?

At first glance, “whomst” almost seems like an actual word. But rather than being some archaic form of “who” or “whom,” “whomst” has its origins in a meme. You won’t find it in the Oxford English Dictionary, and you probably shouldn’t use it in any formal academic work.